Category Archives: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders: DSM-5 Diagnostic Codes




Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders: Introduction

Conditions which fall within the category of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders all share some key features of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are recurrent, persistent and intrusive anxiety provoking thoughts or images resulting in subsequent repetitive behaviors referred to as compulsions. Obsessions may include thoughts, feelings, ideas and sensations that compel a person to do specific behaviors or compulsions. Some of the more common obsessions include excessive counting, ruminating about physical flaws, hoarding and picking at one’s skin. Some of the resulting rituals which are common among individuals diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder frequently include recurrent handwashing, frequently checking doors and locks and avoidance of specific situations. For an individual to be considered for a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder it must be disruptive to their daily existence and functioning. Disorders listed in this category all share the common feature of excessive preoccupation along with the subsequent engagement in repetitive behaviors.

Changes from the DSM-4 TR to the DSM-5:

There were significant changes from previous editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Obsessive-compulsive disorder was previously classified in the DSM-4 TR as an anxiety disorder. The new DSM-5 has created a standalone chapter separate from the other anxiety disorders. This also follows revisions within the ICD 10 CM which also classifies OCD separately from anxiety disorders. However, there should never be any confusion as to the close relationship between obsessive-compulsive disorders and anxiety disorders. When the separation of obsessive-compulsive disorder from anxiety disorders was anticipated prior to the publication of the new DSM-5, psychiatrists supported the move significantly more often than other mental health clinicians, with only 40% to 45% of other mental health professionals supporting the move to the new category. Many psychologists, counselors and other mental health professionals did not support the change because of the fact that most treatment protocols for obsessive-compulsive disorder are also similar for anxiety and other related disorders. As is the case with most anxiety related disorders and depression, comorbidity is frequently the rule rather than the exception.




Some of the new disorders that fall within this category include excoriation (skin picking) disorder, substance/medication -induced obsessive compulsive and related disorder, hoarding disorder and obsessive-compulsive and related disorder due to another medical condition. Also, the diagnosis of trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder) was moved from the DSM-4 TR classification of impulse control disorders to this new classification of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders in the DSM-5.

Diagnosis:

An important aspect of diagnosis is to differentiate obsessive-compulsive disorder from other mental health disorders by the key features of obsessive preoccupation and repetitive behaviors. Once this has been accomplished, diagnosis can proceed.

Diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder can be challenging in that there is a high level of comorbidity with other diagnosis. It is very common for a person with this diagnosis to also exhibit

symptoms of anxiety disorders and depression; eating disorder; somatoform disorder; hypochondriasis; impulse-control disorder, especially kleptomania; and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Also, there is a significant amount of literature considering the comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette’s syndrome.

Prevalence:

It has been estimated that as many as one in 100 or 2 to 3 million adults currently have obsessive-compulsive disorder. Among children it is estimated that nearly one in 200 or 500,000 children and adolescents may receive this diagnosis. These estimates do not include other related disorders. Hoarding is believed to affect about 4% of the general population. Trichotillomania may affect as many as 2.5 million Americans, and as many as 3.8% of college students are believed to exhibit symptoms of excoriation.

Treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders:

The most commonly reported treatments include a combination of medication and psychological treatments. Some studies have found cognitive behavioral therapy to be more effective than treatment with drugs or often has been found to be an appropriate replacement after the initial symptoms have been reduced. The International Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Foundation has recommended exposure and response prevention (ERP), which is a type of cognitive behavioral therapy and has concluded that this type of therapy may reduce the symptoms by as much as 60% to 80% for active participants in therapy.

General information on obsessive-compulsive disorder can be found on subsequent pages along with information specific to each diagnosis within the new DSM-5 category of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders.

Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders DSM-5 Diagnostic Codes:

300.3 (F42) Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Specify if: Tic-related

300.7 (F45.22) Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Specify if: With muscle dysmorphia

300.3 (F42) Hoarding Disorder
Specify if: With excessive acquisition

312.39 (F63.2) Trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder)

698.4 (L96.1) Excoriation (skin picking) Disorder

294.8 (F06.8) Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorder Due to Another Medical Condition
Specify if: With obsessive-compulsive disorder-like symptoms, With appearance preoccupations, With hoarding symptoms, With hair pulling symptoms, With skin picking symptoms.

300.3 (F42) Other Specified Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorder

300.3 (F42) Unspecified Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorder

Diagnostic Information and Criterion for Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders adapted from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition American Psychological Association by Paul Susic Ph.D. Licensed Psychologist



Prozac Medication: The Benefits, Side Effects and Dosages




Prozac Medication: An Overview

Prozac is a medication used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia, and frequently severe symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. Prozac is within the drug classification referred to as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s), which is believed to help maintain a elevated level of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain.

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter in the brain which is believed to affect moods. This neurotransmitter is usually quickly reabsorbed after its initial release from neurons in the brain. It is believed that excess serotonin between the neurons is blocked by medications such as Prozac from being taken back up into the releasing neurons resulting in increased levels of serotonin in the brain.

Prozac is most often prescribed to treat depression of the moderate to severe variety which interferes with daily functioning and most often is referred to as major depression. The symptoms of major depression include low mood and low energy, changes in sleeping habits and appetite, decreased sex drive, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, difficulty concentrating, slowed thinking, and suicidal thoughts. However, Prozac can be taken for a variety of other mental health disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder as well as others. It is most often prescribed for adolescents, adults and the elderly but may occasionally be prescribed for children.

Prozac Medication for Obsessive- Compulsive Disorders:

In addition to being used for the treatment of depression, Prozac is also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder. Obsessions are thoughts that won’t go away, and compulsions are repetitive behaviors and actions which are done to relieve anxiety often associated with the obsessions. Prozac is used at times to also treat bulimia which is a binge eating disorder which involves deliberate vomiting and has also been used to treat other eating disorders including obesity.

Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder:

Under the brand name Serafem which includes the active ingredients in Prozac, this depression medication is sometimes prescribed for premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), which is often referred to as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) including mood changes such as anxiety, depression, persistent anger, irritability, and mood swings. There are various physical problems associated with PMDD, including bloating, breast tenderness, headache and joint muscle pain. Symptoms usually tend to begin about 1 to 2 weeks before a woman’s premenstrual period. They are frequently severe enough to interfere with a woman’s daily activities, functioning and relationships.

Prozac Medication: Precautions

You should always be open and honest with your doctor when your taking Prozac. Always give a complete medical history, including liver problems, kidney disease, seizures, heart problems, allergies and history of diabetes. This depression medication has been known to make individuals dizzy or drowsy, making it necessary to be cautious when engaging in activities that require alertness such as driving or using heavy machinery. Alcohol should be limited when on this medication. Caution is also advised if you have diabetes, alcohol dependence or liver disease. Also, caution should be taken when this medication is being used by the elderly as they are more sensitive to the effects of the drug. This drug should only be used if necessary if an individual is pregnant as the medication passes into the breast milk. Because of the possible risk to the infant, breast-feeding while on this medication is not recommended. Consultation with your physician about the benefits and risks of Prozac used during pregnancy and breast-feeding is imperative. Obviously, you should never share your Prozac with others.




Important Facts About This Depression Medication

It has been noted that there can be some very serious and at times even fatal reactions to occur when Prozac is taken at the same time as some other antidepressants such as the MAO inhibitors. Also, you need to be careful when taking high doses of Prozac over a prolonged period of time. If you are taking any other medications for depression or any other prescription or nonprescription drugs you need to notify your physician before beginning on Prozac.

Prozac Side Effects:

Although the Prozac side effects seem to be less than some of the earlier generation antidepressant medications such as desipramine, amitriptyline and nortriptyline, there are still side effects that you need to be aware of. Some of the more common side effects of Prozac are sweating, dry mouth, drowsiness, headache, insomnia and nausea. Some of the side effects that are less likely but at times even more severe are loss of appetite and unusual weight loss, uncontrollable movements such as tremors, decreased interest in sex, flu-like symptoms, and either unusual or severe mood changes. Even less likely but even more potentially serious Prozac side effects include trouble swallowing, vision changes, white spots and swelling on the mouth and tongue, painful and/or prolonged erection and changes in sexual ability. The most severe side effects associated with Prozac are irregular and fast heartbeat, and fainting. Allergic reactions to Prozac are relatively rare but may include itching, rash, swelling, trouble breathing and dizziness. If you notice any reactions after beginning treatment with Prozac, you need to notify your pharmacist or physician immediately. A more complete listing of Prozac side effects follows.

The Most Common Prozac Side Effects:

Abnormal vision, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal dreams, increased anxiety, reduced sex drive, dry mouth, dizziness, flushing, flulike symptoms, headache, gas, impotence, itching, insomnia, loss of appetite, nervousness, nausea, sinusitis, rash, sleepiness, sweating, sore throat, upset stomach, tremors, yawning, vomiting, weakness

Less Common Prozac Side Effects:

Agitation, abnormal taste, weight gain, sleep disorders, bleeding problems, confusion, chills, weight gain, ringing in the ears, palpitations, loss of memory, increased appetite, high blood pressure, frequent urination, ear pain, emotional instability

There have been other very rare side effects reported while taking Prozac. If you develop any unexplained or new symptoms after initiating treatment with this depression medication you need to contact your physician immediately.

Drug Interactions:

In addition to the Prozac side effects mentioned above, there are also concerns for negative food and drug interactions when taking this antidepressant medication. As mentioned previously, Prozac should never be taken at the same time as you are taking MAO inhibitors. This can cause a very serious medication interaction. Also, when Prozac is taken with other medications the effect may be increased, decreased or altered in other ways. You should always check with your doctor when Prozac is taken with the following medications:

Alprazolam (Xanax)
Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
Clozapine (Clozaril)
Diazepam (Valium)
Digitoxin (Crystodigin)
Drugs that impair brain function, such as sleep aids and narcotic painkillers
Flecainide (Tambocor)
Haloperidol (Haldol)
Lithium (Eskalith)
Other antidepressants (Elavil)
Phenytoin (Dilantin)
Pimozide (Orap)
Tryptophan
Vinblastine (Velban)
Warfarin (Coumadin)

Special Warnings if You are Pregnant or Breast-feeding:

Prozac has not been adequately studied for its effects on pregnancy. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant in the near future, you need to talk with your physician as soon as possible to determine whether you should continue taking this depression medication. Prozac is known to appear in breast milk, so breast-feeding is obviously discouraged when taking this drug.

Prozac Dosage:

It is most common for your Prozac dosage to be taken once or twice a day and should be taken exactly as prescribed by your physician. It needs to be taken regularly to be effective. If it is possible, you should take your Prozac dosage at the same time every day.

Some patients have found that it can take as much as four weeks to feel any significant effects and get some relief from their depression. Doctors will also commonly maintain the treatment regimen for about nine months after the first initial three-month treatment trial. Some individuals who experience obsessive-compulsive disorder may not feel the full effects for as much as five weeks.

The Recommended Prozac Dosage:

The most common starting dosage of Prozac is 20 mg daily taken in the morning. Your physician may increase your dose after several weeks if there has been no improvement in symptoms. Elderly people with kidney and liver disease, and any other individual taking other medications may have their dosage adjusted by their doctor.

When taking a dosage of Prozac over 20 mg, the doctor may ask you to take it once a day in the morning or may ask that you to take two smaller doses in the morning and also at noontime.

The usual Prozac dosage for depression ranges between 20 mg and 60 mg. For obsessive-compulsive disorder, the usual dosage of Prozac ranges from 20 mg to 60 mg per day, although at times a maximum of 80 mg may be prescribed. The usual dosage of Prozac for bulimia nervosa is 60 mg taken in the morning. As with other disorders, the doctor may start at a lower dosage and increase to this level over a period of time. The most common Prozac dosage for premenstrual dysphoric disorder is 20 mg per day.

For some individuals who have been treated successfully with the daily form of Prozac, their doctor may switch them to a long acting form sometimes referred to as Prozac weekly. Your physician may ask you to skip your daily doses for seven days and then take your first weekly capsule.

If you miss your dose of Prozac you should take it as soon as you remember. If a significant time has passed however, you should skip that dosage and resume your normal dosage schedule.

Over dosage of Prozac:

Prozac like all medications, needs to be taken as recommended. Dosages more than the recommended amount can be dangerous and even fatal. Also, combining Prozac with certain other medications or drugs may cause symptoms of over dosage. If you suspect an overdose, you need to contact your doctor or go to an emergency room immediately.

The most common symptoms of Prozac over dosage include rapid heartbeat, nausea, seizures, vomiting and sleepiness. Some of the less common symptoms of Prozac over dosage include stupor, sweating, rigid muscles, low blood pressure, mania, coma, delirium, fainting, high fever and irregular heartbeat.

By Paul Susic Ph.D. Licensed Psychologist


Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: What you need to know.








Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder 101:

Obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) are usually manifested by repetitive and recurrent thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions), or sometimes both. The individual usually is aware that these thoughts and behaviors are unreasonable, unnecessary, and may seem silly and intrusive but are difficult to resist. People with this disorder do not always have both the obsessions and compulsions but either can and often do interfere with an individual’s daily activities and experiences with others.





What is the difference between obsessions and compulsions?

Obsessions are thoughts of a repetitive nature and are relatively persistent. They may appear as images, ideas or even impulses and have been known to even be violent or aggressive on occasion and are known to intrude on an individual’s consciousness. An individual with obsessive-compulsive disorder may try to ignore or suppress these uncomfortable thoughts and often are aware that they are not very realistic. Some of the more common obsessions are fears related to contamination from germs or bacteria, intrusive thoughts of violent behavior or unrealistic fear of harming oneself or others or of making mistakes.

Compulsions on the other hand are usually seen as repetitive, ritualistic behaviors that are performed in a stereotypical manner and according to specific idiosyncratic rules or patterns. These behaviors while being frequently excessive, relieve discomfort and tension. Some of the more often reported compulsions include constantly rechecking doors to make sure they’re locked, windows are closed, electronics or wires are unplugged, excessive neatness, constantly rearranging and straightening furniture and other things, as well as constantly handwashing to remove dirt and germs.

Prevalence of obsessive-compulsive disorder:

It is believed that this disorder possibly occurs in 2% to 3% of the population. It frequently begins in the late teens and possibly early 20’s. More recent studies have found also a high prevalence of OCD in the elderly.
Many people are upset and embarrassed by the thoughts and behaviors associated with OCD. Most individuals who suffer from this disorder try to keep it secret and hide it well enough to limit the disruption to their life. However, obsessions and compulsions may and often do cause enough distress and incapacitation to interfere significantly in the sufferer’s daily experiences. Other complicating factors associated with this disorder is that it may be accompanied by other mental disorders such as depression, alcoholism, abuse of tranquilizers or sleeping pills, and significant interference with an individual’s ability to work and carry on normal social activities. While some people with this disorder experience a spontaneous remission, for most individuals, the symptoms seem to come and go to some degree resulting in occasional partial remission. About 10% of the people who suffer from this disorder develop chronicity with the symptoms remaining relatively unchanged.

Is there treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder?




As with many of the anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder can significantly improve with treatment utilizing a combination of medications and cognitive and behavioral psychotherapy. Some of the more recent pharmacological treatments have included the effective use of SSRI’s, such as citalopram (Celexa), fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil) and sertraline (Zoloft) in treating this condition. Paroxetine and sertraline were recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of OCD as well as for the use of panic disorder. Fluvoxamine has also received relatively recent approval. However, improvements may take as much as 6 to 8 weeks of treatment with these medications and frequently seem more likely for the compulsions rather than the obsessions.

Psychotherapy has also been found to be effective in the treatment of this anxiety disorder. Most therapists seem to rely upon a form of therapy referred to as cognitive behavioral therapy, which helps an individual to consider their thoughts and how they impact upon their behaviors and moods. As with all anxiety disorders, feel optimistic that you can have successful, effective treatment from obsessive-compulsive disorder.

By Paul Susic Ph.D. Licensed Psychologist


Some information from the Johns Hopkin”s Medical Guide to Health After 50